United Way campaign ends Nov. 18

Next Friday, November 18, is the last day of this year’s United Way campaign in the Olympia School District.

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United Way pledge forms have been distributed to all schools and support buildings. Completed forms need to be given to the building contact person or front office staff by November 18.

For those interested in donating, United Way is sponsoring a ’12 for 12′ Seahawks Campaign. Anyone who donates $12 (or more) during each of the next 12 months will be provided a “Live United” Seahawk green and blue T-shirt.

For more information, contact Kim Doherty in the district’s Communications Department at kdoherty@osd.wednet.edu or (360) 596-6108.

November Wellness newsletter

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Don’t miss this month’s issue of “Wellness is a Way of Life!” newsletter. The newsletter is provided by the Child Nutrition department as a wellness resource for all employees.

The November newsletter includes articles about the benefits of eating together more as a family and why Romaine lettuce is a healthy choice.

Read the full Wellness newsletter. Previous issues from this year are available on the Olympia  School district website Child Nutrition Web page.

Earn clock hours for Spanish classes

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Earn clock hours for Spanish classes  offered in November and December through the Educational Service District 113 (ESD 113).

Classes are offered from 3:30-5:30 p.m. and 6:30-8:30 p.m. on the dates and times listed on the adjacent flier.

Click the adjacent image to access a larger version of the flier.

Middle and high school teachers invited to apply for $250 mini-grants

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The Thurston County School Retirees’ Association is accepting applications for its $250 middle and high school teacher mini-grants for the 2016-17 school year.

The deadline to apply for the mini-grants is January 18, 2017. The grants are designed “to provide an opportunity for  teachers to acquire materials or provide experiences for their students above and beyond what is paid for with district funds. The materials or experiences should supplement and enhance building or district goals.”

View and download a copy of this year’s application. The form is also available at http://www.thurstoncountysra.org.

Thurston County School Retirees’ Association is a chapter of the Washington State School Retirees’ Association.

Learn more about alternative routes to certification program on Nov. 29

Below is information submitted by Capital Region Educational Service District 113 announcing an upcoming meeting about alternative routes to teacher certification:

Do you work in the schools and want to become a certified teacher? Do you have a BA already, but not a certificate? Come hear about a program that may be for you. We are partnering with Seattle Pacific University to offer an alternative routes to certification program. The program runs for an entire year, four quarters, and is grant-subsidized to make more affordable. It is a teacher residency certificate program only, not a master’s degree. If you want to hear more, or know someone who might be a good fit, please come to our informational meeting and check out our website: http://spuarc.org/   We are accepting applications for the 2017-18 cohort through February 1, 2017.

Alt Routes Teacher Information Meeting

Tuesday, 11/29: 5-6 p.m.

Capital Region Educational Service District 113

6005 Tyee Dr SW, Tumwater, WA, 98512

Pacific Grays Harbor Room

Olympia School Board named a ‘Board of Distinction’

 

dsc_0050The Olympia School Board has been named a “Board of Distinction” in Washington state.

Olympia is one of 24 school boards from among 295 school districts statewide selected to receive the recognition this year from the Washington State School Directors Association (WSSDA).

“Each of these boards demonstrates the excellent work done by Washington’s 295 school boards and 1,477 school board members,” said WSSDA President Chris Nation. “This program gives us a chance to acknowledge that commitment to their students and communities.”

The Olympia School Board will be recognized on November 17 during the annual WSSDA conference in Spokane. WSSDA will also announce the 2016 Board of the Year winner(s) during the recognition ceremony.

Olympia School Board members include President Mark Campeau, Vice President Eileen Thomson, and directors Justin Montermini, Joellen Wilhelm and Frank Wilson. In addition to the five elected board members, Olympia High School student Rachel Hodes serves as this year’s student representative to the board.

Superintendent Dick Cvitanich, who will join board members at the awards ceremony in Spokane, said, “I have worked as a superintendent for almost 11 years, and I have never worked with a board more closely connected to their schools. They know teachers by name and their programs, challenges and successes. Their work is both professional and personal. I am thrilled with this recognition they have received at the state level.”

Cvitanich continued, “I am proud of the recognition our board received because it is so well deserved. They never lose sight of trying to do what is best for our students and families. Even during challenging budget years, their focus remained on preserving classroom instruction. They are hard working, honest, respectful and know how to laugh. I can’t think of a better combination.”

Board President Campeau said, “I would like to thank WSSDA for honoring the Olympia School District Board of Directors as a Board of Distinction. I would also like to thank Superintendent Dick Cvitanich for his leadership and all district staff for their commitment to our students and community.”

The annual Board of Distinction program honors school boards that demonstrate effective use of the Washington School Board Standards. The standards, developed and adopted by WSSDA in 2009, promote research-based governance practices that lead to high levels of student and district achievement, and help close the opportunity gap.

Award applicants submitted essays and supportive evidence to demonstrate how they are putting the standards into practice. This year, applicants addressed the following:

  • Being accountable and open to public, and seeking divergent perspectives in its decision-making.
  • Adopting a collaboratively developed district plan focused on learning and achievement.
  • Employing and supporting quality teachers, administrators and other staff, and providing for professional development.

Applicants also discussed specific decisions their boards had made and evidence on how they were working to help close the opportunity gap.

An independent review panel reviewed all applications submitted.

Safety Tip of the Week

This week Wendy Couture, the district’s safety and risk reduction manager, shares tips about preventing “mousing elbow.”

Preventing Mousing Elbow

“Hey doctor, I don’t play tennis, so how can I have tennis elbow?”

Tennis elbow is also known as lateral epicondylitis. It refers to a condition that results in soreness to the outside of the elbow and forearm, typically to the dominant arm.

Tennis elbow is an overuse injury, though the cause can stem from a sudden blow to the elbow or a forceful pull of the forearm. Commonly, micro-tears occur to the extensor forearm muscle tendon near the elbow resulting in pain and discomfort. Pain is most pronounced when grasping objects with the palm down (pronation), shaking someone’s hand or turning a doorknob.

With a move by many employers to go “paperless,” computer mouse use has increased dramatically. Navigating through software applications with multiple windows, tabs and dropdown menus has become extremely mouse-click intensive, setting the stage for a repetitive stress injury such as tennis elbow.

The risk of developing this condition can be caused by the placement of the mouse on the work surface that requires an awkward extended reach. Additionally, the size and shape of the mouse can be contributing factors depending on the size of the person’s hand as well as the condition of the forearm muscles.

The good news about tennis elbow is that it’s not permanent if given prompt intervention and adequate recovery time. Here are some tips on avoiding tennis elbow related to computer mouse use.

  • Position the mouse close to the side of the keyboard with minimal reach.
  • Increase the mouse pointer motion speed to reduce force exertion.  The mouse properties are accessed through the computer control panel with the pointer options tab and motion (select a pointer speed) the means of adjustment.
  • Take a micro-stretch break every half hour.
  • Alternate mouse location from the favored side of the keyboard to the opposite side (though this takes some adaptation).
  • Learn control key shortcuts for the software application.
  • If tennis elbow has already resulted (from mouse use), replace the conventional mouse with an “in-line” design.

United Way campaign continues through November 18

uwtc-finalThis week marks the first of the two-week United Way campaign in the Olympia School District.

United Way pledge forms have been distributed to all schools and support buildings. Completed forms need to be given to the building contact person or front office staff by the last day of the campaign, Friday, November 18.

For those interested in donating, United Way is sponsoring a ’12 for 12′ Seahawks Campaign. Anyone who donates $12 (or more) during each of the next 12 months will be provided a “Live United” Seahawk green and blue T-shirt.

For more information, contact Kim Doherty in the district’s Communications Department at kdoherty@osd.wednet.edu or (360) 596-6108.