Editing captions in Microsoft Word or Google Docs

Clapperboard

The YouTube captioning workflow is wonderful in that in negates the need to manually transcribe the audio from our videos, but automatically generated captions still require editing for accuracy. While this editing can be done directly within YouTube, as described in our captioning guide, users may prefer to edit their text within Microsoft Word or Google Docs.

Such a workflow enables users to utilize the more powerful text editing tools, such as spellcheck or find and replace, available within Word or Google Docs.  

To edit your captions in Word or Google Docs:

  1. Navigate to YouTube Studio and go to the Subtitles menu on the left.
  2. Select the video you wish to work on.
  3. On the Video Subtitles screen, select Duplicate and Edit. The transcript of the video will be displayed within the captioning tool.
  4. Select all of the text (Ctrl+A or Cmd+A) and copy it (Ctrl+C or Cmd+C).
  5. Open your preferred text editor and paste the text (Ctrl+V or Cmd+V).
  6. Edit the captions within the text editor and then select all and copy it.
  7. Return to the captioning tool, delete the previous text and paste in your revised text.
  8. Select Assign Timings and then Publish.

The Communications and Community Relations Department is offering an additional Zoom workshop on the YouTube captioning workflow on February 1. If you have captioning questions or tips in the meantime, please reach out to Robert Hardy, the district’s website accessibility specialist.

Creating Captions for Video Content; workshops set Jan. 11 and Feb. 1

YouTube app on iPhone

Creating and sharing online video content can be an excellent way to engage with students and their families. Captioning such content ensures a broader swath of our community is able to enjoy it and be involved.

While manually captioning a video can be time consuming, the district encourages staff to use YouTube to vastly simplify and streamline the process. Videos uploaded to YouTube are automatically transcribed, negating the need to type out each word. Using this workflow, staff will upload their video, wait for YouTube to process the video and then revise the captions for accuracy. A guide on the steps involved is available on the district’s Website Accessibility Resources page, and the Communications and Community Relations Department has also put together a screencast demonstrating the tool.

The Communications department is also offering workshops demonstrating the tool. Attendees will learn how to leverage YouTube’s speech recognition software to efficiently create captions. Additional tips include increasing the accuracy of the automatic captioning, how to edit the captions for grammar and spelling and how to correctly format captions for sounds or music.

If you are interested in producing video content, but are unsure where to start, this blog post has you covered. If you have additional accessibility questions or tips, please reach out to Robert Hardy, the district’s website accessibility specialist.

New workshops on creating accessible documents and videos

Workshop sign

The Communications and Community Relations Department is offering additional Zoom workshops on creating accessible documents and videos. Learn how to incorporate accessibility into your workflow and efficiently create accessible content to share online. Staff are also welcome to bring their existing documents and brainstorm on how to create accessible versions for the web.

Creating Accessible Content

This one-hour course offers a broad overview of the components of accessibility, as well as how to create accessible documents to share online. Authoring tools covered include Microsoft Word, Google Documents, Microsoft PowerPoint, Google Slides and more.

Enhancing the Accuracy of Automatically-Generated Captions

Interested in creating accessible videos to share with our community? Attendees of this workshop will learn how to leverage YouTube’s speech recognition software to efficiently create captions. Tips include increasing the accuracy of the automatic captioning, how to edit the captions for grammar and spelling and how to correctly format captions for sounds or music.

If you have additional accessibility tips or questions, please reach out to Robert Hardy, the district’s website accessibility specialist.

Acrobat Pro Accessibility Part 4 – Adding Tags

The Touch Up Reading Order (TURO) Tool allows users to apply/edit tags in a document and modify the document’s reading order. It is the primary tool used in PDF remediation.

To access it, go to Tools > Accessibility > Touch Up Reading Order. Note: If the Accessibility menu doesn’t display, go to View > Tools > Accessibility.

When you open the TURO tool, your view will change. If your PDF is tagged, grey content area boxes will appear with numbers in the top left. These numbers signify the read order on that page. Users may instead analyze the tag types by selecting Structure Types rather than Page Content Order.

For more complex documents, such as complex forms or documents containing tables, ensure “Display like elements in a single box” is unchecked.

If no content areas appear, your document is likely untagged. Tags can be manually added using the TURO tool, or added automatically using the Add Tags to Document tool from within the Accessibility Toolkit. Documents tagged using the automatic tool should be checked for accuracy using the Tags Pane and TURO tool afterwards.

Adding Tags to a Document Using the Touch Up Reading Order tool

To tag an item using the TURO tool:

  1. Open the TURO tool from within the Accessibility Toolkit.
  2. With the tool open, hovering your mouse over your document will display a crosshair. Using this crosshair, draw a box around your content element. A few notes:
    • The box must fully include the element. It will not register any content unless the element fits entirely within the square.
    • As you draw selection zones, you may inadvertently select additional content. It is possible to add or remove content from your current select. This is particularly helpful when working with tables or forms.
      • Mac:
        • Add Content to selection: Shift-click to add content to the selection.
        • Remove content from selection: Option-click to remove content from the selection.
      • Windows:
        • Add content to selection: Shift-click to add content to the selection.
        • Remove content: Control-click to remove content from the selection.
  3. Once the element is highlighted, select the corresponding tag type from the TURO tool. Alternatively, right click the element and choose the correct tag from the menu.

Tagging an Element as Decorative

The TURO tool offers an option to tag an element as ‘background.’ This tag type effectively hides the element from the Tags Panel, and thus renders it inaccessible to screen reader users. This type of tag may be used for decorative elements, or for sections of blank lines.

When considering if an element is decorative, ask yourself if additional information is included with the element, or if its removal will have any impact upon the content of the message.

If you have any questions regarding using Acrobat Pro or other accessibility concerns, please reach out to Robert Hardy in the Communications and Community Relations Department.

Previous posts in the Acrobat Pro Accessibility series:

Acrobat Pro Accessibility Part 3 – Navigating the Tags Pane

Person appears to be ready to mark a checklist of items. Next to person doing this is a laptop computer.

This week Robert Hardy, our district website accessibility specialist, continues the series on creating accessible documents within Adobe Acrobat Pro. Please email Robert with any accessibility tips or questions.

The Tags Pane displays the programmatic structure of a PDF document. The goal when remediating PDFs for accessibility is to ensure the Tags Pane accurately reflects both the content and structure of your PDF.

Displaying the Tags Pane

Despite being a fundamental tool within Acrobat Pro, the Tags Pane is not displayed by default. To display the Tags Pane, go to View > Show/Hide > Navigation Panes > Tags. The Tags Pane will be displayed on the left of the Acrobat Pro window.

Understanding and Navigating the Tags Pane

The Tags Pane displays the content of the PDF nested within structural tags, much like HTML. For instance, a section of heading 1 text will be contained within an H1 tag, and images will be contained within Figure tags. While all documents are unique, a standard document’s tag tree may appear as:

  • Tags
    • Document
      • H1
        • Document Title text
      • P
        • Introductory paragraph text
      • H2
        • Section Title text
      • P
        • Section paragraph text
      • Figure
        • Image (dimensions)

When selecting an element within the Tags Pane, the corresponding content will highlight. The Pane can be navigated using either the keyboard arrows or the mouse. A screen reader, or other assistive technology, is likely to rely upon the tag tree when reviewing a PDF, so the order of the tags within the Tags Pane is crucial. Elements can be dragged and dropped into the correct order.

Next time we will cover adding and deleting tags within a standard text document. In the meantime, if you have any questions regarding using Acrobat Pro or other accessibility concerns, please reach out to Robert Hardy in the Communications and Community Relations Department.

Previous posts in the Acrobat Pro Accessibility series:

Acrobat Pro Accessibility Part 2 – Repairing Language, Title and Alternative Text Errors

Two people meeting in front of a laptop.

This week Robert Hardy, our district website accessibility specialist, continues the series on creating accessible documents within Adobe Acrobat Pro. Please email Robert with any accessibility tips or questions.

Last week’s blog post covered enabling the Accessibility Tools Pane and running an accessibility check within Acrobat Pro. This week we’ll cover repairing some of the more common errors encountered when using the Acrobat Pro Accessibility Checker.

Primary Language

The primary language of a document is important, as it tells the screen reader which language and pronunciation to use. If you are seeing “Primary language – Failed” in your Acrobat accessibility checker, follow these steps to repair it:

  1. In the Accessibility Checker pane, select “Primary language- Failed”
  2. Right Click and select “Fix.”
  3. Acrobat will attempt to detect the document language. If it is incorrect, select the language from the drop-down.
  4. Click ok.

If your document’s language isn’t listed as an option, you can manually set the language using three letter ISO 639-2 language codes. A comprehensive list of ISO language codes is available on the Library of Congress website. To manually set the language using one of these codes:

  1. Go to File>Properties
  2. Select the Advanced tab
  3. Under Reading Options, type the corresponding language code into the Language field. For instance, if the document’s language was Vietnamese, we would enter ‘Vie’ in the language field.
  4. Click OK.

Title

The title field of a document allows the screen reader user to hear the title as they enter a document. It is typically displayed in the toolbar above your document. To fix the title error, follow these steps:

  1. In the Accessibility Checker pane, select “Title – Failed.”
  2. Right click and select “fix.” This will apply your document’s filename to the document. 

If you would like a different document title:

  1. Click File > Properties
  2. Enter a title into the “Title” field and click OK.

Figures alternative text – Failed

When assistive technologies such as a screen reader encounter an image, they require alternative text to describe the image to the user. Effective alternative text defines both the content and the function of the image. A simple experiment when writing alternative text is to imagine if the image was missing – would the alternative text convey the entirety of the image’s message?

To fix the alternative text error within Acrobat Pro:

  1. In the Accessibility Checker, expand “Alternate Text”, then “Figures alternate text – Failed”, then select “Figure 1”. The corresponding figure will highlight.
  2. Right click “Figure 1” in the Accessibility Checker, and select “Fix.” A pop-up window will appear. Enter the alternative text, or select “decorative figure”.
  3. If there are multiple errors, select the right arrow and make your way through them, adding text as required.
  4. When you are done, click “Save & Close.”

Thank you for your work in creating accessible PDFs. In our next post in the series, we’ll cover using the Tags Pane, a powerful tool that is fundamental to PDF accessibility. In the meantime, if you have any questions regarding using Acrobat Pro or other accessibility concerns, please reach out to Robert Hardy in the Communications and Community Relations Department.

Acrobat Pro Accessibility Part 1 – Enabling Accessibility Tools and Performing an Accessibility Scan

Adobe Acrobat Pro, also known as Adobe Acrobat Pro DC or Acrobat XI Pro, is a powerful tool with the power to create and repair accessible PDFs. While Acrobat DC or Acrobat Reader are free tools used to read PDFs, Acrobat Pro is a licensed tool used to remediate PDFs or create fillable forms. Users without Acrobat Pro can create accessible PDFs by exporting to PDF from different content authoring platforms.

This post, the first in a series, will cover setting up your accessibility workspace within Acrobat Pro and running a basic accessibility check.

Enabling Accessibility Tools

Acrobat Pro Accessibility Tools Pane

While Acrobat Pro contains a powerful accessibility suite, it is disabled by default. To enable the Accessibility Tools Pane, go to View > Tools > Accessibility. This will enable the Accessibility Tools Pane on the right side of the application.

The Accessibility Tools Pane contains a wealth of tools, most prominently:

  • Full Check – A thorough and versatile accessibility checker.
    • Add Tags to Document – Useful for remediating a PDF that was imperfectly created. This may be helpful when working with scanned documents, or documents that have been ‘printed’ to PDF.
    • Set Alternate Text – Useful for moving through all the images in a document and adding alternative text to them.
    • Touch Up Reading Order (TURO) – This is the primary tool in PDF remediation. It can be used to add or edit tags, as well as alter the reading order of the document.

Running an Accessibility Check

The Full Check tool performs a thorough accessibility check, and highlights errors within the document. To perform a Full Check:

Accessibility Checker issues found
  1. Expand the Accessibility Tools Pane and select Full Check.
  2. The Accessibility Checker Options window will open. It is generally advised to use the default settings, so select Start Checking.
  3. The left pane will shift to the Accessibility Checker review. The number of potential issues is displayed alongside each issue category. Expand them using the arrows alongside each category type to see the individual issues.
  4. Right-clicking an issue will provide an additional menu with options to Fix, Skip Rule, Explain, or Check Again.

The next post in this series will cover some of the more common issues found using the accessibility scanner, as well as how to repair them. In the meantime, if you have any questions regarding using Acrobat Pro or other accessibility concerns, please reach out to Robert Hardy in the Communications and Community Relations Department.

Accessibility Tip of the Week: Alt Tags – “Title” or “Description” Field?

This week Robert Hardy, our district website accessibility specialist, shares about choosing the correct field when adding alternative text to a document. Please email Robert with any accessibility tips or questions.

When adding alternative text to a document within Google Docs or Microsoft Word, users are presented with both a Title and a Description field. This can create confusion for the author as they may unsure which field to populate.

Google Docs and Microsoft Word alternative text screens. Both screens have a Title and a Description field.For both Google Docs and Microsoft Word, the correct field is the Description field. Screen readers rarely access the Title field, rendering it largely useless.

Remember to consider both the content and the function of the image when deciding on alternative text. What information would be missing if the image was removed? Be sure to include that in the alternative text.

For more accessibility tips for Microsoft Word, Google Docs and other software suites, visit the district’s Website Accessibility Resources page.  If you have questions or tips regarding creating accessible documents, please reach out to Robert Hardy.

New YouTube caption editing tool

In response to increasing demand for closed captioning, YouTube is starting to roll out a new captioning service. With improved speech recognition and a revamped user interface, the new tool promises to make captioning video content even easier.

Some YouTube users may encounter a new set of options when entering the Subtitles menu of their YouTube Studio. To begin editing automatically generated captions for a video, users can click “Duplicate and Edit.”

YouTube caption screen showing a Duplicate and Edit option

This will bring up the new YouTube caption editor. This tool, unlike previous iterations, allows for users to edit the captions in either paragraph or caption form. This makes editing the captions more natural and efficient. To toggle between the different layouts, users can click either “Edit as Text” or “Assign Timings”.

YouTube caption editing screen. Edit as Text is selected
YouTube caption editing screen. Assign Timings is selected

Once editing is complete, users may click ‘Publish’ to publish their captions to their live video.

A screencast demonstrating the new tool has been produced by the Communications and Community Relations Department. Additional information on the new YouTube captioning tool may be found on the YouTube help page.

Olympia School District staff are also invited to attend the Enhancing the Accuracy of Automatically-Generated Captions workshop in which we will discuss using the new and old tools. In the meantime, if you have any accessibility questions or tips, please reach out to Robert Hardy in the Communications and Community Relations Department.

New workshops on creating accessible documents and videos

Workshop sign

The Communications and Community Relations Department is offering additional Zoom workshops on creating accessible documents and videos. Learn how to incorporate accessibility into your workflow and efficiently create accessible content. Staff are also welcome to bring their existing documents and brainstorm on how to create accessible versions for the web.

Creating Accessible Content

This one-hour course offers a broad overview of the components of accessibility, as well as how to create accessible documents to share online. Authoring tools covered include Microsoft Word, Google Documents, Microsoft PowerPoint, Google Slides and more.

Enhancing the Accuracy of Automatically-Generated Captions

Interested in creating accessible videos to share with our community? Attendees of this workshop will learn how to leverage YouTube’s speech recognition software to efficiently create captions. Tips include increasing the accuracy of the automatic captioning, how to edit the captions for grammar and spelling and how to correctly format captions for sounds or music.

If you have additional accessibility tips or questions, please reach out to Robert Hardy, the district’s website accessibility specialist.